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Talking Nerdy Episode 101: Kickin’ It Nerd School with Chris Kluwe

Former NFL kicker and current activist, Chris Kluwe, joins us in between signing books on the road. We talk about the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling, the world of gaming, sports, and the BET Awards! We also play a special edition of Jose-Can-Say-So in honor of Jose Canseco’s birthday! Follow Chris on Twitter @ChrisWarcraft

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Talking Nerdy Ep. 95: Drain The Rock Johnson

Special Guest Comedian Dan Scully joins us to talk movies, play games and discuss the Hot Billboard 100 in a way that only people who don’t listen to the latest pop music can do!

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Talking Nerdy, Ep. 84: 50 Ways to Leave Your Penis

In this week’s episode we go over our Oscar Winners once more and one of us gets to spin the Wheel of Pain to discover what their punishment will be. We talk about the new GTA Online expansion, Walking Dead’s slow burn, and the new comic book releases of the week!

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Talking Nerdy, Ep. 83: King Cake Baby Goes to the Oscars!

In this week’s episode, we reveal the new mascot for New Orleans: the terrifying King Cake Baby. We also place our sensible Oscar bets, talk new comic releases, and play some games! It’s the return of America’s Favorite: Jose Can-Say-So and our new social experiment: Dan Explains #Supernatural Tweets from FanGirls. Not a moment is wasted in today’s long episode–ENJOY!

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April 17, 2012 · 12:37 am

Super Dudes Power Show Podcast, Ep. 7–“Dress Code Strictly Enforced”

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April 10, 2012 · 7:28 pm

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February 29, 2012 · 11:20 pm

Dress Down Day No. 138

We all have our weird hobbies, and, for some, those include standing on a Boston street corner pretending to be a coin-operated dancer for tourists and passersby. Once upon a time, a kid stayed inside his room in Boston all the time, not doing this, and he created Facebook and now he wipes his ass with hundreds.

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Former Facebook employee creates useless Networking App

When it comes to Social Networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, some people take the use of words like “Friend” and “Follow” way too seriously. Are you really friends with the hundreds of people you connected with on Facebook? Obviously not. Do you really and truly “follow” every bit of information that people post on Twitter? You’d have to be out of your mind. Most information passed from human to human, to robot, back to human through these sites is not only useless, but completely inane. But it’s supposed to be. It’s entertaining.

Most of us are connected with our actual friends via Facebook, but we interact with them MORE in the REAL WORLD, because they’re actual friends.

Those who we choose to accept as our “friends” or “follow” on Twitter who we have no personal connection with serve only as a mutually beneficial, ego-stroking, sick fascination. And when life feels just a little bit empty, you can fall back on the knowledge that, unlike Ashley, you’re not currently eating at a Denny’s.

Former Facebook employee, Dave Morin, has created a new social network utilizing the scientific knowledge that no human can truly appreciate more than about 50 friends, or have a well-managed social network of over about 150 individuals. But while this is probably accurate, it seems irrelevant when it comes to the ways people use the major social networking tools currently available. His networking application is called Path and works much like a Facebook or Twitter feed, but allows you only to follow (at most) 50 people at once.

His hope is to created a more direct and personal social networking experience for…say…an individual, his family, and half his graduating class. There’s nothing wrong with having a modest group of close-knit friends on a social network, but why sign up for another account on another site that nobody knows about?

On one hand, the advantage is having a fresh start on a new network that hasn’t been sullied by overpopulation, ads, or Ashton Kutcher.

On the other hand, a new network with a fraction of the users severely diminishes the chance that anyone you will ever meet in person will have an account. Not only that, but a network with restrictions on how many people you may “add” severely diminishes any chance that someone with 49 connections will pick YOU to be number 50.

Facebook and Twitter both have “following/friend” restrictions, but many have not reached the large numbers required to peak on how many people you can follow, or how many friends you are allowed to have. Usually that number shifts in relation to how many are following you to create a fair balance.

The tech buzz that any new social network will receive in the blogosphere is inevitable, but for most of us searching to meet new people, interact with others in our field, or just piss the day away looking at how drunk someone we never met was last weekend, Path ultimately has no logical use.

Alex G/

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The Social Network

I’m not at all surprised by Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to remain distant from the David Fincher-directed biopic The Social Network. The film paints the Facebook creator in such a way that he comes across as a not very approachable individual, his inflated ego and nerdy arrogance almost as large as his fast-thinking brain. He’s a genius no doubt, but a socially uncomfortable one. Whether or not the real billionaire is like this or not, I honestly don’t know, nor do I truly care. He’s a fascinating main character in a fascinating film, and that’s all I really need and want to know.

David Fincher’s stylish drama is the true story of the founding of Facebook, the increasingly popular website in which 500 million people can connect with each other through the click of a computer mouse and post messages about the daily goings-on in their lives. And look after pixelated sheep in FarmVille. Based on Ben Mezrich’s non-fiction book The Accidental Billionaires, it is a marvellously crafted character study that will be remembered for many years to come, looked back on in esteemed admiration.

The opening scene, set in 2003, depicts Harvard student Zuckerberg (played effortlessly by Jesse Eisenberg), 19 years old, being dumped by his girlfriend, Erica Albright (A Nightmare on Elm Street‘s Rooney Mara), following what is more a battle of wits to Mark than a regular conversation. After being called an asshole, an intoxicated Mark retreats to his dorm room, switches on his laptop and bitterly rants in his blog about what just happened, calling Erica a bitch and mocking her family name. She’ll come around once reading this, I suppose.

Being the outcast that he is, the super-nerd is then inspired to hack into the Harvard database to steal pictures of female undergraduates and create a website, Facemash, in which the girls are rated for their attractiveness. The site’s extraordinary overnight popularity – which crashes servers – catches the attention of Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss (both portrayed by Armie Hammer, with Josh Pence as a body double), who ask for his help in creating a site called Harvard Connection.

He initially agrees to be the programmer, but ends up avoiding the two brothers, working with his best friend and roommate, Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield), in developing theFacebook, Mark’s idea for a new social networking site. With the project growing and growing, eventually becoming worldwide, Mark finds himself in the middle of two multi-million-dollar lawsuits, his personal relationships teetering toward destruction.

The film is perfectly intertwined with both the early and later stages of Facebook’s development and the court hearings Mark is attending alongside Eduardo and the Winklevoss twins. Flawlessly paced and intricately structured, The Social Network is captivating right from the crowd noise playing over the Columbia logo to the poignant and thought-provoking end scene.

Don’t be put off by the subject matter at hand; the movie is not “Facebook: The Internet Motion Picture“, but is instead a timely tale of greed, jealousy and ambition. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing) has opted to not make this a film glamorising Facebook (the site barely even features), but a film about two friends torn apart by business, their differing visions leading to the downfall of their relationship.

Despite uploading beautiful imagery into the movie’s exquisitely designed profile, masterful filmmaker David Fincher (Zodiac, Se7en) is more restrained than usual, rightfully stepping out of the bright, shining spotlight to let Sorkin’s pitch-perfect writing splendidly work its magic. Sorkin displays some Oscar-worthy material here, his deftly playful script acting as the ever-beating heart of The Social Networks body, coating the film with hard-hitting drama as well as LOL-inspiring humour. His script is both funny and moving, succeeding in creating striking characters from the real-life entrepreneurs.

In Zuckerberg, Sorkin has shaped a unique, quick-witted character who thinks primarily in 1s and 0s, his personality more robot-like than emotive, an element which makes him a heck of a lot more intriguing than he should be. With Eisenberg in the role, Zuckerberg is a remarkable creature who’s a nerd without being a stereotype; a calculating, seemingly cold-hearted but enchanting machine that never shuts down and never shuts up once opening his smart-assed mouth; and I am more than happy to listen to every titillating word to jump off his tongue.

We are at doubt as to whether or not we should be rooting for him; Sorkin presents us with a character who is an overtly ambitious asshole, but such a well written one that you can’t help but love him. His best friend, played by future Spider-Man Andrew Garfield, is more of the socially adept kind; he is friendly and boyish, Garfield showing off his acting chops as an intelligent, but non-geeky tech-head.

Coming in half-way through the film, Justin Timberlake plays Sean Parker, the inventor of music-sharing service Napster and helper of getting Facebook set up. He’s a smirking, charismatic wild horse with aspects of paranoia, Timberlake perfectly cast as the party boy who Mark sees eye-to-eye with.

As our two sibling antagonists, Hammer is spectacular, eloquently pulling off two roles who are on-screen at the same time. Self-proclaimed “gentlemen of Harvard”, they become jealous of Mark’s success, planning on suing him for allegedly stealing their idea. They’re both avid oarsmen, their talents shown off in a gorgeously shot sporting scene which contains Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ remix of Edvard Grieg’s “In The Hall of The Mountain King”.

Speaking of music, the soundtrack is bloody brilliant. Electronic and moody, Reznor (who you may know from Nine Inch Nails) and Ross’ score nails (heh heh) the atmosphere of each scene, from a dark, intimidating nature to a more light and breezy territory. Fabulous stuff.

You could spend hours arguing about whether or not certain “facts” we are presented did actually happen as they are portrayed, but Sorkin’s script is nonetheless the work of gods. Not just a film for internet dweebs, David Fincher’s The Social Network is an era-defining masterpiece very much deserving of some naked, golden statuettes. I didn’t just like this. I loved it.

Ten outta ten

Watson

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